Best Books for Your Baby’s First Library - Conscious Cooking

Best Books for Your Baby’s First Library

Reading to your baby is such a beautiful, bonding and magical experience. It’s also one of the most powerful ways to positively influence your baby’s speech and cognitive development.

“Children who are read to during infancy and preschool years have better language skills. In addition, parents who spend time reading to their children create nurturing relationships, which is important for a child’s cognitive, language and social-emotional development.” – American Academy of Pediatrics

You can start reading to them in the womb. What you read doesn’t really matter at that stage. And as soon as they are born, you can start with stories but also with high-contrast black and white images to develop and strengthen their eyes. Point to images and explain what they are. Let your baby touch and turn the pages. And make it fun by using an enthusiastic tone and by using silly voices or sounds once in a while. Your baby will love read books with you! Make sure to read to him or her daily.

Reading to your baby is also a great way to immerse them in the sounds and rhythms of speech, which is needed for language development.

Remember that children absolutely love and enjoy repetition. They won’t get bored reading the same book over and over. That’s how they learn.

I have read, and researched, so many baby books, and here are some of 20 books to get to build your baby’s first library. I found that choosing books and build a library was so much fun!

 

First, here’s a little guide for books by age.

0 to 6 months: Choose books with little or no text and big, and with high-contrast pictures as your baby’s vision is still developing. Also consider books with interactive stuff. Babies love to hear your voice and the different tones, and the special cuddle time. Take your time and let your baby look at each pictures. Also, you can try to read a complex storybook or whatever you enjoy reading. They benefit from hearing your voice.

7 to 12 months: Introduce short board books with 1-2 sentences per page. Sensory books that have different textures are also great, or with things like flaps, textures or crinkle pages. It’s a good time to introduce picture books with animals, colors, objects, etc.  Stick to board books still, or cloth or vinyl books. Also, choose books with one word per page to not confuse them with too many images. By doing so, you will help them build their vocabulary.

with things like flaps, textures like a bit of fur or rubber on the page, crinkle pages or electronic buttons to keep their interest.

13 to 18 months: You can start introducing books with a sentence or two per page. Make funny sounds and faces, ask your little one questions like “What is that?”, “What does the cow say?”, or “Where is your belly button?!” Have fun with your baby.

19 to 24 months: Keep reading to your toddler. Make it part of your daily routine, and bedtime routine. Your little one may be asking for the same book over and over again. That’s how they learn – with repetition.

 

20 Book Recommendations (0 to 12 months) – Buy in your favorite book store!

1. Look Look, by Peter Linenthal

2. Baby Touch & Feel: Animals (but they are all great!)

3. Ten Tiny Toes, by Jayne Church

4. First 100 Words, by Roger Priddy

5. Moo, Baa, La La La, by Sandra Boynton

6. Goodnight Moon, by Margaret Wise Brown

7. Guess How Much I Love You, by Sam McBratney

8. Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? By Bill Martin Jr and Eric Carle

9. Where Is Baby’s Belly Button? By Karen Katz

10. Dear Zoo, by Rod Campbell

11. The Very Hungry Caterpillar, by Eric Carle

12. The Runaway Bunny, by Margaret Wise Brown

13. I Love You to the Moon and Back, by Amelia Hepworth

14. Love You Forever, by Robert Munsch

15. If Animals Kissed Goodnight, by Ann Whitford Paul 

16. Sing a Song of Mother Goose, by Barbara Reid

17. Pat the Bunny, by Dorothy Kunhardt

18. Peek-A Who?, by Nina Laden

19. Where’s Spot?, by Eric Hill

20. I’ve Loved You Since Forever, by Soda Kotb 

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